how will you go about finding that thing the nature of which is totally unknown to you?

mermaid
 
Leave

the door open for the

unknown, the door into the dark.

That’s where the most important things come from,

where you yourself came from, and where you will go. Three years ago

I was giving a workshop in the Rockies. A student came in bearing a quote

from what she said was the pre-Socratic philosopher Meno. It

read, “How will you go about finding that thing the nature

of which is totally unknown to you?”

I copied it down, and it has

stayed with me

since.

 

The student

made big transparent photographs

of swimmers underwater and hung them from the ceiling

with the light shining through them, so that to walk among them was

to have the shadows of swimmers travel across your body in a space that itself

came to seem aquatic and mysterious. The question she carried struck me as the basic

tactical question in life. The things we want are transformative, and we don’t know

or only think we know what is on the other side of that transformation.

Love, wisdom, grace, inspiration – how do you go about finding

these things that are in some ways about extending

the boundaries of the self into unknown

territory, about becoming

someone else?

 

Rebecca Solnit
 

the great tao floods and flows in every direction

Modern Swells
 

The great Tao

floods and flows in every direction.

Everything in existence depends on it, and it doesn’t deny

them. It accomplishes its work without naming or making claims

for itself. Everything in existence is clothed and nourished

by it, but it doesn’t strain over anything.

Aimless, ambitionless, it might be

called “small.”

 

Everything

in existence returns to it,

and still it doesn’t lord over

anything. Thus it might

also be called

“great.”

 

Because

it has no desire

to be great, thus

it can achieve

greatness.

 

The Tao te Ching of Lao Tzu,

Chapter 34


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if we persevere, a great success is at hand

 

The

literal translation

of “Chun” is “a blade of grass

pushing against an obstacle as it sprouts

out of the earth.” Receiving this hexagram is a sign

that beyond the difficulties and pressures that

surround you, a success lies waiting.

In order to bring it fully into the

light, you must be patient

and persevere in

nonaction.

 

No matter

how fervently one desires

to resolve a situation, to intervene

impatiently now will only hinder the progress

of good fortune. Accept and bear with the discomfort

of chaos without attempting to push it away.

Allowing it to clear of its own accord,

in its own time, is the only way

of insuring a subsequent

blossoming of

success.

 

from The I Ching, or Book of Changes

Hexagram 3: Chun / Difficulty at the Beginning

 

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