patience in the heart of chaos

ap

 

A sage is subtle,

intuitive, penetrating, profound. 

His depths are mysterious and

unfathomable. 

 

The best one can do is

describe his appearance: the sage

is alert as a person crossing a winter stream; as

circumspect as a person with neighbors on all four sides; 

as respectful as a thoughtful guest; as yielding as

melting ice; as simple as uncarved wood; 

as open as a valley; as chaotic

as a muddy torrent. 

 

Why “chaotic

as a muddy torrent”? 

Because clarity is learned by

being patient  in the

heart of chaos. 

 

Tolerating

disarray, remaining at rest, 

gradually one learns to allow muddy water to

settle and proper responses to reveal themselves. 

Those who aspire to tao don’t long for fulfillment. 

They selflessly allow tao to use and deplete

them; they calmly allow tao to renew

and complete them. 

 

The Tao te Ching of Lao Tzu,

Chapter 15

 

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who can say that tao is far from us?

césar ancelle hansen

 

I have discarded

the world of fame and profit.

How elegant is the morning sun shining

on the rafters and eaves. How cool are the terrace

and pond after the rain. I burn incense to break the deep

silence, and drink the spring water and relax in joy. I penetrate

into the wonders of Tao, and chant ancient sutras. When my

mind is at ease, my spirit is gay. When understanding

is gained, there is nothing left to comprehend.

Who can say that the realm of Tao is far

from us? How tranquil it is; as at

the beginning of Heaven

and Earth.

 

Ni Tsan

 

where the practice really begins

meditate within eternity

 

As you

continue to practise,

please understand: there is

nothing to worry about. Establish

this feeling of being relaxed and unworried,

securely, in the mind. Once the mind is concentrated

and one-pointed, no mind-object will be able to penetrate

or disturb it, and you will be able to sit in the meditation

posture for as long as you want. You will also

be able to sustain concentration without

any feelings of pain and

discomfort.

 

Having

developed samadhi

to this level, you will be able

to enter or leave it at will. When you

leave it, it will be at your convenience.

You simply withdraw at your ease, rather

than because you are feeling lazy or tired.

You withdraw from samadhi because

it is the appropriate time to

withdraw from it, and you

come out of it at

your will.

 

You enter

and leave this samadhi

without any problems. The mind

and heart are at ease. If you genuinely have

samadhi like this, it means that sitting meditation

and entering samadhi for just thirty minutes or an hour

will enable you to remain cool and peaceful for many days

afterwards. Experiencing the effects of samadhi like this

for several days has a purifying effect on the mind.

Whatever you experience will become an object

for contemplation. This is where

the practice really begins. It is

the  fruit which arises as

samadhi matures.

 

Ajahn Chah